Disasters as Art?

By Zerto, on 25 March, 2012

What is disaster art?

A few weeks ago, while catching up on a few days’ worth of Disaster Recovery articles, I stumbled upon some amazing images of catastrophic moments frozen in time and rendered into sculptures.  I was excited to discover the artist was my former boss Eyal Gever, an expert in the field of 3D animation as well as a renowned traditional artist (and all-around great guy.)

Eyal’s unique sculptures – replicating specific moments of a disaster – explore the sublime beauty within catastrophic occurrences.  As you can see in these photos, the work is breathtaking and allows you to reflect on the design and composition of a disaster, rather than the human element we commonly focus on when viewing images of a car crash, explosion, flood or tsunami.

An article on Eyal Gever recently appeared in Wired Magazine and provides some details on the artistic process:

“Gever uses software to simulate catastrophes on screen and then turns the most compelling frames into 50cm resin models, using a £215,000 Objet 3D printer.   Gever, 41, became a CGI virtuoso in 1990 through the Israeli military. A decade of commercial software development later he decided to channel this expertise into his art. The simulation tracks each visible particle’s trajectory and Gever pauses the video on the most affecting frame. Each piece takes 60 hours to print.”

In Eyal’s own words, “I create sculptures that are based on software I’ve developed that allows you to see the world through the eye of a high-speed 3D simulated camera. It provides us the ability to see something we normally cannot see, the moment of suspension in time. Beauty can come from the strangest of places, in the most horrific events.”

The art is arresting, not only because of the subject matter, but because it reminds us that creativity and productivity can flourish when you step back from the emotion of a given subject matter and approach it in a new way.  You can follow Eyal or find out about upcoming installations of his work at www.eyalgever.com.

The video below explains a bit about Eyal’s creative process:

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